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ORIGINAL RESEARCH


Physical, physiological, and immune status changes, coupled with self-perceptions of health and quality of life, in subjects receiving chiropractic care: A pilot study


WR Boone Ph.D., DC; Paul Oswald B.Sc.; Kelly Holt B.Sc.; Randy Beck, Ph.D., DC.; Kanwal Singh, MD; Andrew Ashton, B.Sc.

Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research ~ July 5, 2006 ~ Pages 1-6


Abstract


Objective: A pilot study to gather preliminary information regarding chiropractic care and possible links to immune status and improved aspects of health and quality of life.

 

Methods: The study followed 11 novice chiropractic subjects (7 males, 4 females) over a period of 9 months. Other than presenting with biomechanical complaints, the subjects represented a healthy population as determined by history, complete blood count, and immune status. Over a 9 months period, subjects received chiropractic adjustments when indicated. A self-reported quality of life questionnaire was completed by each subject following the initial visit (baseline), and at 3 and 9 months reassessment periods. At the same intervals, a complete blood count and an immune panel including absolute counts and percentages for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD56 and CD4/CD8 ratio were determined.

 

Results: Subjects demonstrated significant reductions in all chiropractic indicators at 3 months (p = 0.00) and 9 months (p = 0.00) compared to baseline. A positive change in Life Enjoyment occurred from 3 months to 9 months (p = 0.026), representing a large clinical effect (0.80). Significant negative correlations were also observed between motion palpation findings and CD56% and absolute CD56 count at baseline, suggesting a stress related link. Overall, The subjects appear to have maintained a healthy physiology. This conclusion is based on the complete blood count and immune profile throughout the duration of the study, as variations overall remained within reference values for healthy adults established by Auckland Hospital (New Zealand).

 

Conclusion: This pilot study has provided some preliminary information regarding chiropractic care and possible links to immune status and improved aspects of health and quality of life. Limited numbers of subjects, however, preclude definitive conclusions. Larger studies, including ill and healthy populations, to investigate the parameters presented herein and others such as killer cell activity will be necessary to test the conclusions presented.

 

Key words: Chiropractic, immune status, motion palpation.


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